Skip to main content

In It, But Not Of It

A recent situation at the public high school where my oldest two attend has been a topic of conversation in our home.

A high school girl availed herself of the boy's bathroom. A fellow male student snapped a picture of her while she was in there and posted it on social media. Both the female student who entered the boy's bathroom and the male student who snapped the picture have been disciplined. The female is not allowed to enter the boy's bathroom, regardless of whether she identifies as a boy. And under no circumstances may anyone take pictures of others in a bathroom and post those pictures on social media. Cue the firestorm.

Those who sympathize with the female student have begun to protest. She should, they argue, be able to enter the boy's bathroom if she identifies as a boy.

Another group of students gathered around the flagpole during the protest to pray for the school and all involved.

My high school daughter was registering her outrage and frustration with a particular class. It is in this class where the students are invited to speak freely about issues of the day. On this particular day, there were many voices in support of the female and outrage at the stance of those who do not support her. As if these students are taking a page out of the "grown-ups" playbook, the conversation was a free-for-all where there was much demonization and name-calling, exclusively, as she told it, towards those who believed boys should use the boy's bathrooms and girls should use the girl's bathroom. Bigots! Homophobes! Closed-minded! Republicans (gasp)! Christians (double-gasps)! Frustrating, but not surprising. My high schooler was all worked up. She is not a bigot or a homophobe or a Republican (too young to vote), but she is a Christian. She did not like, one little bit, that Christians were being "thrown under the bus". She was defensive and agitated.

My 8th-grade daughter was quietly listening to all of this. As the conversation with my high schooler began to trail off, my 8th grader chimed in (as the high schooler went upstairs).  She had tears in her eyes (which eventually became a cry): I'm paraphrasing, but here is what she said:

"I keep thinking about that girl at the high school. She is getting a lot of support, but I know she is probably getting a lot of criticism too. And I keep thinking, what would I say to her if I saw her. 
I don't agree with her. I think she is wrong. She should go to the girl's bathroom, even if in her head she thinks she is a boy. I don't even know what that means.
But doesn't God call us to love our neighbor? Doesn't He call us to love our enemy? Dad, if I saw her, I wouldn't want to argue with her or tell her I disagree with her. I think I would just want to be kind to her. Something tells me she is hurting or unhappy. I feel bad for her. Loving her or being kind to her is the most important thing, don't you think?"

I do.

------------------------------------------------------

Two very recent and relevant blog posts can be found here and here. It would encourage you to read both of them.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

A Wonderfully Diverse Uniformity

We ordained and installed 5 new officers at Grace Community Presbyterian Church on December 15, 2019. It has been my privilege to work with and walk alongside these 5 guys for almost a year, as our process in training and study is that long. We've done this five times now, in our relatively young and small church. Every time I am stunned by God's kindness in giving us men, gifted men, who are willing to shoulder the burden of ordained office. This time, something hit me for the first time. Among our officers, we have teachers, a school administrator, a pilot, a lawyer, a man involved in the insurance industry, a COO and CEO of a health provider in our area, a man who is supplier to car mechanics, an IT man for an oil company, an IT man for a multi-million dollar corporation, an artist and sign-maker, a man who does something with bonds, working with markets all over the world, a man who works in the construction industry, and a rules and regulations guy for BNSF Railr

Getting the Most from Reading your Bible

 The start of the new year often means the start of a new Bible reading plan. For most of us, we start strong, fight through the "descendants" and difficult names. The familiarity of Exodus (thanks to  Cecil B. DeMille ) puts some winds in our reading sails.  Then we hit the rough waters of Leviticus. You get the idea... God reveals Himself to us in His Word. We want to see Him in His Triune glory there. Fighting against the difficulty of reading regularly, consistently, and prayerfully is one of the most important battles we face every day that God gives us.  Below, I am recommending three resources that may help you, not just stick with your Bible reading, but love God's Word more, even the difficult parts. My prayer is that one or two or all three of these resources will help you fight and win the battle so you can consistently read God's Word and God will consistently bless you through your personal Bible reading.  This is not a countdown, from best to least best.

David Powlison (1949-2019)

David Powlison died around 11am on Friday, June 7th, 2019. I wrote this about him a couple of years ago: He taught some of my counseling classes at WTS and is the Executive Director of CCEF. His ability to pastor the human heart and his relentless pursuit of the glory of Christ was on display in the classes he taught. We would often begin classes by singing a hymn together and Dr. Powlison would pull a nugget of truth from the hymn and riff for a few minutes. It was always encouraging to our faith. I will forever be grateful to Dr. Powlison and his wife Nan for how kind they were to me and my young family. He has left a treasure for us in what he has published. Without reservation, I recommend everything below: The Journal of Biblical Counseling . You can subscribe to the digital copy or a hard copy. He was the editor and past copies are available. Seeing with New Eyes . This is a "vision shaping book" that makes the case that the Bible is sufficient for all we e