Skip to main content

Saying Goodbye to Goodbyes

The grief is deep when a loved one dies.

The sadness of having to send a friend off on a new adventure far from you is palpable.

Packing up and driving our first-born to college is on our agenda in the coming new year. I get a pit just typing about it.

Goodbyes are hard.

In every instance there is a longing to be together again. There is a heaviness to the memories, the pictures bring a new ache.

We were born for one another; for communion and community. So every time we utter "goodbye", that little word precedes a tear at the "ever-presence" of that relationship. After the tearing comes the tears.

As a Christian, I want to dig around and seek out hope and comfort and permanence when I'm grieving or sad or I ache.  I want heart-ache and unpleasantness to toss me to God, His Word and His promises. God's Word, specifically, Revelation 21:1-4, does just that; pulls me to God and His promises.

There we see that we will experience the reality that the dwelling place of God is with man and that we will be with Him and He will be with us

One of the many glorious things of this passage is the wonderful plurality that God purposed in that promise. It is for us, not just me. Not just you.

The Christian's communion with the Triune God will be experientially constant and forever present. As a Christian, you will always and forever be with Him. There is and will be no greater joy.

But God wants us to know that we will forever enjoy Him...together. True communion with Him and with one another.

With every goodbye and the sadness that will surely follow, lean into that promise.

Know that there is nothing permanent about goodbyes for God's people. As the former things pass away, we will, together, say goodbye to goodbyes forever.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

A Wonderfully Diverse Uniformity

We ordained and installed 5 new officers at Grace Community Presbyterian Church on December 15, 2019. It has been my privilege to work with and walk alongside these 5 guys for almost a year, as our process in training and study is that long. We've done this five times now, in our relatively young and small church. Every time I am stunned by God's kindness in giving us men, gifted men, who are willing to shoulder the burden of ordained office. This time, something hit me for the first time. Among our officers, we have teachers, a school administrator, a pilot, a lawyer, a man involved in the insurance industry, a COO and CEO of a health provider in our area, a man who is supplier to car mechanics, an IT man for an oil company, an IT man for a multi-million dollar corporation, an artist and sign-maker, a man who does something with bonds, working with markets all over the world, a man who works in the construction industry, and a rules and regulations guy for BNSF Railr

David Powlison (1949-2019)

David Powlison died around 11am on Friday, June 7th, 2019. I wrote this about him a couple of years ago: He taught some of my counseling classes at WTS and is the Executive Director of CCEF. His ability to pastor the human heart and his relentless pursuit of the glory of Christ was on display in the classes he taught. We would often begin classes by singing a hymn together and Dr. Powlison would pull a nugget of truth from the hymn and riff for a few minutes. It was always encouraging to our faith. I will forever be grateful to Dr. Powlison and his wife Nan for how kind they were to me and my young family. He has left a treasure for us in what he has published. Without reservation, I recommend everything below: The Journal of Biblical Counseling . You can subscribe to the digital copy or a hard copy. He was the editor and past copies are available. Seeing with New Eyes . This is a "vision shaping book" that makes the case that the Bible is sufficient for all we e

The Pulpit, Preaching and People

The whole reason I started this 'blog' was to have a public place to record my thoughts as I read books.  Why not just keep a journal or something more private? I don't know.  I like the idea of having access to this where I am.  The public nature of it makes me think there is a heightened accountability to keep it up, even if no one reads it.  And maybe the guy who will eventually come and take my place at GCPC will want to see what I have read and how I thought about preaching. That is why, for 2012, I want to devote my reading to the task of preaching.  My plan, God willing, is to read the following books, in this order: The Preacher and Preaching: Reviving the Art in the Twentieth Century ; Sam Logan, ed. The Imperative of Preaching: Theology of Sacred Rhetoric ; John Carrick Speaking God's Words: A Practical Theology Of Preaching ; Peter Adam The Priority of Preaching ; Christopher Ash Positive Preaching and the Modern Mind ; P.T. Forsyth Preaching with Co